Radiation stops Japanese clean-up
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Storage tanks for radioactive water The radioactive water will be temporarily stored in special tanks when it is removed from the site
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Operators of Japan's Fukushima nuclear plant have suspended an operation to clean contaminated water hours after it began due to a rapid rise in radiation.

Some 110,000 tonnes of water have built up during efforts to cool reactors hit by the 11 March earthquake and tsunami.

The contaminated water, enough to fill 40 Olympic-sized swimming pools, has been at risk of spilling into the sea.

A spokesman for the plant operators said engineers were trying to find the cause of the jump in radiation levels.

"The level of radiation at a machine to absorb caesium has risen faster than our initial projections," a spokesman for the Tokyo Electric Power Company (Tepco) said.

Earlier this week, officials had warned that the growing pools of radioactive water at the Fukushima Daiichi plant were in danger of spilling into the sea within a week.

This article is from the BBC News website. © British Broadcasting Corporation, The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites.

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/go/rss/int/news/-/news/world-asia-pacific-13819767

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VIDEO: Can tech help with a good night's sleep?
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Click's Lara Lewington finds out whether the secret of waking up refreshed could lie in an alarm that recognises the body's sleep pattern.

This article is from the BBC News website. © British Broadcasting Corporation, The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites.

Source: http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/rss/int/news/-/1/hi/programmes/click_online/9515802.stm

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Serving up profits
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Rafael Nadal celebrates with the Wimbledon trophy after winning the title in 2010Players may want success, but organisers and sponsors also hope Wimbledon will reap dividends

As the 125th Wimbledon Championships get under way, the man in charge of running the tournament is wondering what the weather holds in store for the next fortnight.

But Ian Ritchie, the chief executive of the All England Club, is not too concerned, as the retractable roof that has been in place on Centre Court since 2009, guarantees that no days will be a complete wash-out.

Even before the roof was built, though, the unpredictable British weather wasn't able to dampen spirits or profits at the tournament.

Last year's event made a £31m profit, or surplus. That is what was left over after the All England Club took out its operating expenses.

The average surplus over the last four or five years has been in the region of £25m to £30m.

All of that is passed on to the Lawn Tennis Association (LTA).

The LTA has been criticised for not doing enough to improve the state of British tennis - Andy Murray is the only British man in the world's top 100, while only two British women make the top 100. But the All England Club refuses to get involved.

"We work on the assumption that what we do is manage the Championships and work on that. What the LTA do with that [money] is up to them," says Mr Ritchie.

Wimbledon makes more than 50% of its gross income from selling the broadcasting rights to the tournament around the world, with the event now shown in 185 countries.

Li Na arrives for the WTA pre-Wimbledon partyChina will be following closely Li Na's progress at Wimbledon

According to Mr Ritchie, Wimbledon made its biggest surplus of about £35m in the late 1980s and early 1990s, boosted by revenues from German TV, when players like Boris Becker and Steffi Graf were at their peak.

Li Na, who became the first Chinese player to win a Grand Slam with her victory at the French Open, is now generating a similar interest in China, and Asia generally.

"We've been in discussions with [state broadcaster] CCTV in China about coverage this year. We've been involved with them for some time," says Mr Ritchie.

But he admits that the revenues generated may not have as much of an overall boost to finances as those from German TV did in the past.

"The rights fees paid in China are not as significant [as in other countries] but you get audiences of tens of millions of people," he says.

"It is important for us to make sure Wimbledon is seen around the world."

The second biggest portion of Wimbledon's income comes from sponsorship, or what Wimbledon likes to call its official suppliers.

The All England Championships is the only one of the four Grand Slams that does not have advertising around its courts.

Instead, it enters into long-term agreements with brands to provide goods and services.

Ian RitchieIan Ritchie took over at the All England Club at the end of the 2005 Championships

Its oldest official supplier is Slazenger, which has supplied balls to the Championships since 1902.

New additions to the official suppliers list this year are Sony, with whom the All England Club has worked to develop 3D coverage of both finals and the mens' semi-finals; Jacob's Creek, who replaces Blossom Hill in providing wine; and Lavazza, which is replacing Nescafe as the official coffee of The Championships.

For the suppliers, even if they do not get the advertising space that other tournaments offer, being associated with the Wimbledon name alone can be very attractive.

Hertz, which provides cars to transport players around during the Championships, says it is the most important corporate event it does internationally.

"It marries tradition and modernity," says Michel Taride, president of Hertz International.

The company gets about 700 tickets for its hospitality suite and high visibility for its brand in London.

It is currently in the middle of a five-year deal and although it has been cutting costs throughout the downturn, decided this was one cost they were not going to cut.

Sometimes there is a value in the tournament which is hard to quantify but is highly important in the services industry where building relationships with clients is crucial, says Mr Taride.

Wimbledon has always insisted that revenues from tickets themselves make up a relatively small amount of the overall income.

Corporate tickets are limited to about 10% of overall ticket sales for the show courts.

The majority of tickets go through the public ballot, which Mr Ritchie describes as "the most egalitarian" system.

But there has also been anger that those who can afford a debenture ticket - which for Centre Court for 2011-2015 costs £27,750 and guarantees a ticket for every day of the Championships for those five years - can also profit from them, as it is the only ticket which can be sold on.

But profits or not, there is one key element which keeps the tournament at the top of its game year after year.

The fact that the players value the tournament so much is the real key to the success of the tournament, says Mr Ritchie.

"It is all about the players at the end of the day."

This article is from the BBC News website. © British Broadcasting Corporation, The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites.

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/go/rss/int/news/-/news/business-13789076

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Olive oil 'helps prevent stroke'
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Olive oilOlive oil has benefits for the heart
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Olive oil can help prevent strokes in people over 65, a study suggests.

Researchers followed around 7,000 people aged 65 and over living in three French cities, for at least five years.

They found those who used a lot of olive oil in cooking or as a dressing or dip had a lower risk of stroke than those who never used it.

The researchers say older people should be given new dietary advice regarding olive oil, based on the findings, which are published in the journal Neurology.

Lead author, Dr Cecilia Samieri, of the University of Bordeaux, said: "Our research suggests that a new set of dietary recommendations should be issued to prevent stroke in people 65 and older.

"Stroke is so common in older people, and olive oil would be an inexpensive and easy way to help prevent it."

“A lot more research needs to be carried out to scientifically test the effectiveness of olive oil as an ingredient that can protect against stroke”

Sharlin Ahmed The Stroke Association

The researchers studied the medical records of 7,625 people aged 65 and older living in Bordeaux, Dijon and Montpelier.

They were asked whether they used olive oil in cooking, on salads or with bread intensively, moderately or never.

Most used extra virgin olive oil, which is common in France.

After around five years, 148 of the men and women had had a stroke.

The study found the stroke risk was 41% lower in those who regularly used olive oil compared with those who abstained, once other factors such as diet, exercise and weight were taken into account.

This works out as a 1.5% risk over six years, compared with 2.6%.

Commenting on the study, published in Neurology, Sharlin Ahmed of the Stroke Association, said: "Olive oil has long been known to have potential health benefits.

"It is believed that it could protect against conditions such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure and heart disease and so it's promising to see that it could have a similar protective function against stroke.

"However, it's important to note that a person's risk of stroke would only be reduced through consuming olive oil as an alternative to other cooking fats and as part of a healthy balanced diet that is low in saturated fat and salt.

"This is also a study based on responses from the public and not a clinical trial. A lot more research therefore needs to be carried out to scientifically test the effectiveness of olive oil as an ingredient that can protect against stroke."

This article is from the BBC News website. © British Broadcasting Corporation, The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites.

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/go/rss/int/news/-/news/health-13782797

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Pasta power
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Different types of pasta
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Pasta has topped a global survey of the world's favourite foods. So how did the dish so closely associated with Italy become a staple of so many tables around the globe?

While not everyone knows the difference between farfalle, fettuccine and fusilli, many people have slurped over a bowl of spaghetti bolognese or tucked into a plate of lasagne.

Certainly in British households, spaghetti bolognese has been a regular feature of mealtimes since the 1960s. It's become a staple of children's diets, while a tuna-pasta-sweetcorn concoction can probably be credited with sustaining many students through their years at university.

But now a global survey by the charity Oxfam has named pasta as the world's most popular dish, ahead of meat, rice and pizza. As well as being popular in unsurprising European countries, pasta was one of the favourites in the Philippines, Guatemala, Brazil and South Africa.

And figures from the International Pasta Organisation show Venezuela is the second largest consumer of pasta, after Italy. Tunisia, Chile and Peru also feature in the top 10, while Mexicans, Argentineans and Bolivians all eat more pasta than the British.

TOP FIVE WORLD PASTA CONSUMERS
Girl eating spaghetti
Italy - 26kg per head per yearVenezuela - 12kgTunisia - 11.7kgGreece - 10.4kgSwitzerland - 9.7kg

Source: International Pasta Organisation, June 2010

Global sales figures reflect the world's love affair with pasta - they have risen from US$13bn (£8bn) in 2003 to US$16bn (£10bn) in 2010. The analysts at Datamonitor predict it will hit US$19bn (£12bn) by 2015.

Just in the UK, retail sales of dry and fresh pasta amounted to £53m in 1987. In 2009, the figure was £282m - include pasta-based ready meals and the value rises to £800m, says consumer research experts Mintel.

So how did pasta become so popular? It's because it is cheap, versatile and convenient, says Jim Winship, from the UK-based Pizza, Pasta and Italian Food Association. A sauce to go with it can be made from simple ingredients.

"You can create lots of different dishes with it. It tastes good and it's filling. It also has a long shelf life, so you can keep it in the larder until you need to put a meal together."

But that's only part of its success. Pasta is also easy to mass produce and transport around the world, making it a popular product with food companies as well.

"It's always been an industrial product," says John Dickie, professor in Italian Studies at University College London and author of Delizia! A History of the Italians and their Food.

Giles Coren

“It's poor people's food. It's unsophisticated. It's the same as bread”

Giles Coren Food critic

"It is definitely one of the things that has contributed to its success - it's easy to transport and has a long shelf life. It has commercial genes."

Winship agrees the success of dried pasta - the vast bulk of which is still made in Italy - is also because it is a great product to manufacture and export, because it is relatively inexpensive to produce, is easy to transport and does not require refrigeration.

"But it does require a lot of equipment and the price of wheat is not cheap," he adds.

Pasta has always had a global aspect as its origins are not purely Italian, which is unsurprising considering it can be made with just wheat and water.

The Greeks and Romans had pasta-like foods but they tended to be baked, not boiled. Ancient China had dumplings, but it's a myth that the Venetian explorer Marco Polo returned from China with pasta in 1295.

The most accepted theory is that the Arab invasions of the 8th Century brought a dried noodle-like product to Sicily. This early pasta was made using flour from durum wheat, which Sicily specialised in. Under Italian law, dry pasta - or pasta secca - can only be made from this type of wheat.

And despite being considered a cheap meal now it was the preserve of the rich in the very beginning, says Prof Dickie.

"We tend to think of pasta like potatoes but it has never been viewed as a bland staple. It's been associated with prestige - people used to buy votes with pasta."

The first reference to pasta in Italy was noted in 1154 and it was about an export factory in Sicily, he says.

He says its breakthrough as a common food came in Naples in the 1700s, when it was recognised as "a good way to feed a large part of the populace".

TOP FIVE WORLD PASTA PRODUCERS
Spaghetti maker
Italy - 3.2m tonnes per yearUS - 2.6mBrazil - 1.3mRussia - 858,000Switzerland - 607,000

Source: International Pasta Organisation, June 2010

But pasta popularity outside of Italy really took off at the turn of the 20th Century with large-scale Italian immigration to the New World. This is when it started to become known as Italy's national dish and really started to travel around the world, he says.

Italian restaurateur Antonio Carluccio said pasta may have a long history, but the Italians made it their own by eating it with tomatoes.

He says most pasta is spaghetti outside of Italy but there are actually 600 different types and shapes and each region cooks it differently. He says its appeal is in the taste and its nutritional value.

"It is pleasurable with a good sauce, but it should just be coated, otherwise you lose the taste of the pasta. It is a complex carbohydrate which releases all the goodness slowly and you feel satisfied for a long time.

"I don't know one person who doesn't like pasta. It is very similar to bread - both are made with flour and water and they both need an accompaniment."

He's clearly not met food critic and broadcaster Giles Coren, who described pasta as "overrated gloppy stuff" that appeals only to children.

"Ask a footballer what they can cook and they always say spaghetti. It is what you reach for when there is nothing else left in the larder. It's poor people's food and it's unsophisticated. It's the same as bread - you just boil it instead of putting it in the oven."

So as popular as it is, pasta hasn't conquered everyone in the world.

This article is from the BBC News website. © British Broadcasting Corporation, The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites.

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/go/rss/int/news/-/news/magazine-13760559

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Sports car men 'want no-ties sex'
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A luxury sports carA good investment or just a tool to attract hot dates?
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Men who buy flashy sports cars might be more successful at getting a date, but women do not see them as good marriage material, a study suggests.

Researchers from Texas and Minnesota carried out tests on nearly 1,000 people to find out the signals sent out by spending behaviour.

Although men used spending on luxury items as a short-term mating signal, women did not spend to attract men.

The study appeared in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.

The US researchers discovered that women found a man who chose to buy a flashy, expensive product - like a Porsche car - more desirable than the same man who bought a non-luxury item, like a Honda Civic.

However, women are aware of a man's intentions in acting this way, the study says, because women found the man with the Porsche less desirable as a marriage partner than as a date.

Daniel Beal, co-author of the study and assistant professor of psychology at Rice University, said the sports car started to lose its sheen.

"When women considered him for a long-term relationship, owning the sports car held no advantage relative to owning an economy car.

“The anticipation of romance in women doesn't trigger flashy spending as it does with men”

Jill Sundie University of Texas at San Antonio

"People may feel that owning flashy things makes them more attractive as a relationship partner but, in truth, many men might be sending women the wrong message."

According to the study, men who flaunt expensive, showy items like Porsches to woo potential sexual partners are like peacocks who display their tail feathers before potential mates.

But they said that not all men favoured this strategy - only those men who were interested in short-term sexual relationships with women.

Women, in contrast, did not spend excessively to attract men.

Jill Sundie, lead author of the study and assistant professor of marketing at University of Texas at San Antonio, said: "Obviously women also spend plenty of money on expensive things. But the anticipation of romance doesn't trigger flashy spending as it does with men."

This article is from the BBC News website. © British Broadcasting Corporation, The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites.

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/go/rss/int/news/-/news/health-13795628

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Monroe's Seven Year Itch dress auctioned for $4.6m
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Marilyn Monroe in The Seven Year Itch (Sept 1954)
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The white dress worn by Marilyn Monroe in the 1955 film The Seven Year Itch has sold for $4.6m (£2.8m) at an auction in Los Angeles.

The dress was part of a collection of film memorabilia collected by actress Debbie Reynolds over four decades.

She had hoped to house them in a museum but the project never came to fruition.

Other lots included Elizabeth Taylor's Cleopatra headdress, a Charlie Chaplin bowler hat and the guitar played by Julie Andrews in The Sound of Music.

Reynolds, 79, was in tears as the auction on the iconic Seven Year Itch dress closed, CNN reported.

Auction house Profiles in History had expected it reach around $2m.

It was bought by an unidentified buyer bidding by telephone.

A red sequined dress and feathered headdress worn for Monroe's role in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes reached $1.47m and a saloon girl costume from River of No Return for $510,000.

Many of the items had been given to Reynolds by her close friend Dame Elizabeth Taylor, who died earlier this year. The horse racing outfit worn by Taylor as a child in National Velvet sold for $73,800.

The trademark bowler hat worn by Charlie Chaplin in several films, including The Little Tramp, reached $135,300 while a dress and pair of ruby slippers worn by Judy Garland in the filming of The Wizard of Oz sold for $1.75m despite not having appeared in the film.

Keya Morgan, a collector of memorabilia and author of a book on Monroe, said the auction was "totally crazy, especially in this recession".

She told CNN Monroe would have been amazed to see her old outfits sell for so much.

Reynolds began collecting props and costumes in 1970 and had amassed some 3,500 items.

Speaking before the auction, she said the cost of maintaining them had become too high and that by selling them "I won't have quite so much responsibility and I can rest a little more".

This article is from the BBC News website. © British Broadcasting Corporation, The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites.

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/go/rss/int/news/-/news/entertainment-arts-13828609

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Extra troops reach Venezuela jail
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An inmate's relative argues with national guardsmen outside the El Rodeo I prison in Guatire, Venezuela (18 June 2011)An inmate's relative argues with national guardsmen outside the El Rodeo I prison
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The Venezuelan authorities say they will resume a major operation aimed at regaining control of a prison near the capital, Caracas.

An extra 400 troops have been drafted in, after more than 3,500 National Guards were unable to take full control of El Rodeo prison on Friday.

This follows a riot last Sunday between rival gangs in which more than 20 inmates were killed.

Attempts to negotiate a peaceful resolution have so far failed.

On Friday, the government announced that its forces had re-taken all of the part of the prison called Rodeo I, accounting for some three-quarters of all inmates.

Two members of the security forces were killed, and at least another 18 injured on Friday.

It is not clear how many casualties there have been among prisoners.

The authorities say one inmate was killed on Friday, and have said photos circulating on social media sites showing more casualties were "fake".

“Their attitude continues to be the same: hostile”

Tareck El Aissami Venezuelan interior and justice minister

An estimated 1,300 prisoners still remain in the part of the prison not under the control of the authorities - Rodeo II.

Some of these prisoners are armed.

The interior minister, Tareck El Aissami, announced on state television that a small group of inmates were using guns to exert control over the other prisoners.

He said he had tried to negotiate with some of these leaders in an effort to get them to surrender.

But these leaders, whom he classified as "negative", had not responded.

"Their attitude continues to be the same: hostile," he said. "They are refusing to let assistance be given to prisoners. They are refusing to have a dialogue."

The minister said they would try to keep dialogue going.

He said "90% of prisoners agreed with the measures taken by the government".

And he went on to say that some of the leaders would be punished by being transferred to high security prisons.

Outside the jail, tense stand-offs have continued, with security forces clashing with angry relatives.

A relative of inmates from the El Rodeo prison throws a tear gas canister back during a riot (18 June 2011)A relative outside El Rodeo prison throws a tear gas canister back at security forces

The security forces have fired tear gas in an effort to disperse groups of relatives of the inmates.

On Friday, the Venezuelan vice-president, Elias Jaua, sought to reassure the prisoners' relatives.

In a televised speech, he explained to them why the government needed to take action.

"The intervention we're carrying out today isn't to massacre their relatives," he said, "it's to protect the lives of more than 5,000 inmates."

Venezuelan prisons are notoriously overcrowded and there have been a series of riots since the beginning of the year.

This article is from the BBC News website. © British Broadcasting Corporation, The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites.

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/go/rss/int/news/-/news/world-latin-america-13825576

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Magic McIlroy nears maiden major
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Rory McIlroy is closing in on a maiden major title with an eight-shot lead over YE Yang going into the final round of the US Open.

This article is from the BBC News website. © British Broadcasting Corporation, The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites.

Source: http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/rss/int/news/-/sport1/hi/golf/13826455.stm

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Webber's Love Never Dies to close
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Sierra Boggess and Ramin Karimloo in Love Never Dies (photo by Catherine Ashmore)Love Never Dies received mixed reviews when it opened in March 2010
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Phantom of the Opera sequel Love Never Dies is to close on 27 August, it has been confirmed.

The announcement comes a little over a year since Andrew Lloyd Webber's musical first opened at the Adelphi Theatre in London's West End.

The show opened to some poor reviews, and after substantial rewrites, was relaunched nine months later.

Although the new version gained a better critical reception, it failed to perform at the box office.

A fresh production of the show opened in Melbourne, Australia, at the end of May with far more positive press.

An in interview earlier this month, Lord Lloyd-Webber attributed the show's failure to being treated for cancer during production, which meant he was unable to give it his full attention.

"With hindsight we should have said, 'Let's put the whole thing on hold until I'm 100% again'. Frankly I wasn't feeling very well," he said.

However, he added that the current Austrailian production "cannot be improved upon".

"It is fabulous to look at and they completely understand what I'm trying to get at with the score. It has a momentum that is wonderful."

The Australian version of the show is expected to transfer to Broadway after its run is completed there.

This article is from the BBC News website. © British Broadcasting Corporation, The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites.

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/go/rss/int/news/-/news/entertainment-arts-13809014

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